How to Find the Perfect Tech Job

Back in March I read an article in Forbes about the Tech Job Market. It quoted that there were over 600,000 Tech jobs advertised in the US market. In fact for every one person in the tech industry, there were five vacancies advertised.

And the same boom is happening in Europe, with the number of digital jobs growing at a staggering rate of 100,000 vacancies per year, according to a 2014 report from European Union’s (EU) digital agenda commissioner, Neelie Kroes.

How to find the perfect tech job Sergey Kotlov

Computer and mathematical science professionals are clearly in demand. Talent rules and subsequently companies identify that it’s all about their ‘people’ now. Indeed some of the world’s biggest tech organizations are prepared to pay the price of a small principality for the best tech talent in the market; creating utopian-style campuses, where the best want for nothing.

Yes, the market is changing. As much a these tech giants are willing to pay the earth for talent, actually it’s no longer all about the money, or the title on your business card. It’s about employee engagement, we want to feel valued and are becoming much more focused on intrinsic benefits. We want to feel appreciated every day, to be surrounded by like-minded creativity and be rewarded on a peer-to-peer level for our positive contributions.

We are no longer solely motivated by the quarterly bonus; instead we value the higher purpose of our role and seeing the impact our hard work is making in an organization. The work-life balance has become all important.

Has the job search market reacted to this changing environment? It’s changing, but at a depressingly slow rate.

Job advertisements generally contain little to no information about the organization; ‘tech company’ is about as much a clue as you’re likely to be given. And forget knowing what the salary expectation is; until you get on to the second, third or even fourth interview!

So, if you’re in the market for a tech job, how do you even find out who’s recruiting with so many smokescreens in the way? Who are the best tech organizations in your city or region? In fact, how can any of us feel inspired, when we are presented with just the bare facts? The only transparent entity is you, as you are asked to provide every minute detail about your career, personal life and the numerous qualities YOU are going to deliver to the organization.

Hiring Nerds_Finding a tech job

Thankfully, one man is on a mission to change the way we search for jobs in the tech market. To make job seeking more transparent, and to open up opportunities with some of the best tech companies out there.

A couple of years back, Sergey Kotlov, Happy Melly Funder, developer, creator of Kudobox and Happy Melly Teller, was himself in a job-seeking position. What he found didn’t inspire him at all.

In Spring this year, Sergey embarked on a European tech company tour. His objective (apart from getting to visit some awesome European cities) was to get to know some of the tech organizations who had a clear company culture, focused on employee engagement and who went the extra mile in creating a positive working environment for their employees.  

During his travels, Sergey met 17 tech companies in cities such as Amsterdam, Stockholm, Berlin, Barcelona and Helsinki. He was happy to report that he would happily recommend at least seven of those organizations to his best friends, if they were ever seeking employment!

FutuFriday at Futurice

FutuFriday at Futurice!

The question was how did job seekers find out about jobs in these great companies? Asked if they used job sites to advertise their vacancies, the unanimous answer was no! Job sites bring the wrong type of candidates. Their philosophy was that they don’t hire a person to fill in a role, they hire people that fit into the organization.

After all, roles and skills can be developed. As Richard Branson commented in his LinkedIn article, How I hire: Focus on personality:

“The first thing to look for when searching for a great employee is somebody with a personality that fits with your company culture. Most skills can be learned, but it is difficult to train someone on their personality.”

Sergey invited those seven tech organizations – The Magnificent Seven – to collaborate on a website project that will help job seekers find the best tech companies in Europe. Where great talent can go to find great organizations, who are looking for like-minded individuals to join their company.

Companies should no longer hide behind a smokescreen. There will be no room for faceless organizations, hidden amongst 600,000 job vacancies. This website is about creating transparency on both part of job seeker and organization.

Sergey and his team know what these tech organizations need, but now he wants to find out more about what YOU need. As a candidate, you should be seeking an exceptional company, in which you can grow and achieve your higher purpose.

To close the gap, we’re rolling out market research, in the form of a series of 15 minute interviews with tech professionals and organizations, and we want to talk to you. We want to find out how you search for a job or for candidates? What do you look for and what factors are important to you?

Join us and help improve the tech recruitment experience in the future. For more information on how to get involved, visit Sergey Kotlov’s blog ChangeGeek

Image credits: 

Alex Lined Part 2 by Susan Murtaugh
Hiring Nerds by Jason Tester Guerilla Futures

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This article is written by Louise Brace on July 14th 2015.

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